1458) Luke 23:26-43; The Crucifixion (b)

As we approach Holy Week, I am posting this meditation on the crucifixion from:

http://www.dwellingintheword.wordpress.com

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(…continued)  32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed.  33 When they came to the place called the Skull, there they crucified him, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left.

What was it like to be crucified?  In days the New Testament was first written, the practice needed no explanation.  But we would do well to appreciate just what happened when someone was crucified.  Although the Romans did not invent crucifixion, they perfected it as a form of torture and capital punishment that was designed to produce a slow death with maximum pain and suffering.

The combination of scourging and crucifixion made death on the cross especially brutal.  The victim’s back was first torn open by the scourging, then the clotting blood was ripped open again when the clothes were torn off before crucifixion.  The victim was thrown on the ground to fix his hands to the crossbeam, and the wounds on the back were again be torn open and contaminated with dirt.  Then, as he hung on the cross, with each breath, the painful wounds on the back scraped against the rough wood of the upright beam and were further aggravated.

When the nail was driven through the wrists, it severed the large median nerve.  This stimulated nerve produced excruciating bolts of fiery pain in both arms, and often gave the victim a claw-like grip in the hands.

Beyond the excruciating pain, the major effect of crucifixion was to inhibit normal breathing.  The weight of the body, pulling down on the arms and shoulders, tended to fix the respiratory muscles in an inhalation state, and hindered exhalation.  The lack of adequate respiration resulted in severe muscle cramps, which hindered breathing even further.  To get a good breath, the victim had to push against the feet, and flex the elbows, pulling from the shoulders.  Putting the weight of the body on the feet produced searing pain, and flexing of the elbows twisted the hands hanging on the nails.  Lifting the body for a breath also painfully scraped the back against the rough wooden post.  Each effort to get a proper breath was agonizing, exhausting, and led to a sooner death.

“Not uncommonly, insects would light upon or burrow into the open wounds or the eyes, ears, and nose of the dying and helpless victim, and birds of prey would tear at these sites.  Moreover, it was customary to leave the corpse on the cross to be devoured by predatory animals.” (Edwards)

Death from crucifixion could come from many sources: acute shock from blood loss; being too exhausted to breathe any longer; dehydration; stress-induced heart attack, or congestive heart failure leading to a cardiac rupture.  If the victim did not die quickly enough, the legs were broken, and the victim was soon unable to breathe.  How bad was crucifixion?  We get our English word excruciating from the Roman word “out of the cross.”  “Consider how heinous sin must be in the sight of God, when it requires such a sacrifice!” (Clarke)

The most significant thing about Jesus’ suffering was that He was not, in any sense, the victim of circumstances.  He was in control.  Jesus said of His life in John 10:18, no one takes it from Me, but I lay it down of Myself.  It is terrible to be forced to endure such torture, but to freely choose it out of love is remarkable.

34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”

This is a word of pure grace.  This is the most powerful example of grace and forgiving love in the whole Bible.  While in so much pain, Jesus asked God to forgive his tormentors.  In this Jesus fulfilled His own command to love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good for those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you (Matthew 5:44).

 And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.  35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him.  They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Christ of God, the Chosen One.”  36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him.  They offered him wine vinegar  37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

It is precisely because He did not save Himself that He can save others.  Love kept Jesus on the cross, not nails.

38 There was a written notice above him, which read:  THIS IS THE KING OF THE JEWS.  39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him:  “Aren’t you the Christ? Save yourself and us!”  40 But the other criminal rebuked him.  “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence?  41We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve.  But this man has done nothing wrong.”  42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”  43 Jesus answered him, “I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise.”

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Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.

–Luke 23:42

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